Lectures

Tuesday 12th March 2019:

Lost and Found: The Rediscovery of Roman London – by John Clark

John Clark was Curator of the Medieval Collections of the Museum of London for many years. He
retired in 2009, but retains his connection with the museum as Curator Emeritus. While studying
the history and archaeology of medieval London, he became interested in the way medieval
Londoners interpreted the past of their own city, for they had no knowledge of what we call ‘Roman
London’. They believed London was much older than Rome, and that its city walls and ancient
buildings had been erected by legendary British kings like Belinus and Lud.

In his talk John will consider how historians began to question this story in the 16th century. With
access to classical texts rediscovered during the Renaissance, and with the natives of the newly
discovered Americas as models for an understanding of the ‘Ancient Britons’ described by Julius
Caesar, they were better placed to recognise the nature of Roman Londinium. After the Great Fire
of 1666, building works revealed remains of Roman London, and they were recorded, collected and
discussed by antiquaries like John Conyers, John Woodward and William Stukeley, setting the
scene for the work by London archaeologists that continues today.

 

 Tuesday 9th April 2019

Gustav Milne

The CITiZAN Project

 Tuesday 14th May 2019

Professor David Perrett

50 years of recording London’s Industrial Heritage

 Tuesday 11th June 2019

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

 Tuesday 8th October 2019

Lyn Blackmore

From Crosse and Blackwell to Crossrail – MOLA excavations at Tottenham Court Road 2009–10

 Tuesday 12th November 2019

Bob Cowie

Shene and Syon: a royal and monastic landscape revealed

Lectures are held at Avenue House, 17 East End Road, Finchley, N3 3QE, and start promptly at 8pm, with coffee/tea and biscuits afterwards. Non-members: £2. Buses 13, 125, 143, 326 & 460 pass nearby and Finchley Central station (Northern Line), is a 5-10-minute walk away.

Excavation

Our past work in the Borough has uncovered much of its history, details of which are available in our many publications. The “digging team” regularly meets at the Garden Room at Avenue House usually on Sundays when finds processing, writing-up and general discussion on future excavation takes place. Members are invited to drop in on these sessions.

Research

Research is actively encouraged and, where appropriate, small teams set up to investigate themes and areas which might lead to excavation and publication. We are currently updating our information on all of Barnet 19 Archaeological Priority Areas

Origins

HADAS (Hendon and District Archaeological Society) was founded in 1961 by Themistocles Constantinides with one aim: to find and prove, on the ground, the Saxon origins of Hendon. Since that time the Society has expanded in area, today encompassing the whole of the London Borough of Barnet and excavation and research now covers all archaeological periods.

HADAS has been one of the most active local societies within the Greater London area. Major excavations have included the West Heath Mesolithic camp site at Hampstead; the Roman site of Sulloniacis at Brockley Hill, a centre of pottery production, Roman Hendon as well as medieval Chipping Barnet and Finchley, where many sites around the High Street have been investigated.

With a membership across the UK and beyond (not to mention the hidden depths of Hendon, Finchley and Barnet!) HADAS is a strong and active local society dedicated to investigating our archaeological heritage.

The objects of HADAS are the advancement of archaeological and historical research and education for the public benefit, with particular reference to the archaeology and history of the London Borough of Barnet.

Benefits of membership include: programme of lectures and outings, a monthly Newsletter, use of our extensive library, opportunities for fieldwork and research.

Publications

The results of the Society’s work are published as specific reports, in our Newsletter or in book form. A book stall is usually a feature of our display at archaeological conferences.

Newsletters

A rota of twelve editors produces the monthly Newsletter, our main means of communication. It contains details of forthcoming lectures and outings as well as reports of the same, news items and booking forms for outings. Those wishing to edit an edition need to contact the Newsletter Co-ordinator, those with articles and other contributions should submit these to the relevant monthly editor. Correspondence and queries for publication are also welcome.

Library

As a registered charity, the aim of HADAS is to educate and inform. To this end we have built up a library of over two thousand books, pamphlets, journals and periodicals all of which are available for loan to our members. The library has proved invaluable to our many members who have studied part-time for an archaeological qualification (usually the certificate or diploma in archaeology from Birkbeck College).